Interactive Clinical Case of the Week

GoldenDent is actively involved in continuing education (CE) and is extremely proud of our ongoing commitment to training other dentists who wish to excel in the use of unconventional dental techniques to obtain excellent clinical results in their practices. Based on requests of several of our customers and past CE attendees, we have implemented what we are calling our Interactive Clinical Case of the Week where we will post a new and unique clinical case each week focusing on various topics including extractions, grafting, implants and much more.

Each case will be quickly explained with step-by-step photography to explain and demonstrate the techniques. We have called this “interactive” as we encourage our dentists to confidentially ask questions about the cases or to seek advice that will be responded to within 48 hours of each request by one of our expert dentists in the areas being discussed. There are several online forums to post questions and to seek advice, but we would like to take a different approach and make our experts available on a confidential one-on-one basis that avoids any negative criticism or unhelpful comments found on many online forums.

Thank you in advance for your time and consideration, we look forward to hearing from you soon to encourage an environment of learning and confidential assistance.

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Case 7 - Figure 1
Figure 1, 2 and 3: Pre-Operative images and radiograph of upper molar, with post and crown, that was agreed upon with patient to be extracted based on treatment plan.
Case 7 - Figure 2
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Case 7 - Figure 3
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Case 7 - Figure 4
Figure 4 & 5: In this case, it was decided to remove the crown prior to extraction. Often times utilizing the Physics Forceps, this is not necessary as you are engaging the beak of the instrument on solid root structure “below” the crown, hence it is very unlikely that such crown would break off during the procedure. To engage the beak of the Physics Forceps, a purchase point is made to engage the beak better on the broken down tooth.
Case 7 - Figure 5
Figure 5:
Case 7 - Figure 6
Figure 6: The beak of the Physics Forceps is engaged sub-gingival 1-3mm on solid root structure.
Case 7 - Figure 7
Figure 7: The handles of the Physics Forceps are NEVER squeezed, but simply held lightly in your hands allowing the power of the lever to elevate the tooth up and out of the socket. If the handles are squeezed, or if you want to treat the instrument like a conventional forcep, there is a risk that too much pressure could be applied to the bumper damaging the soft tissue or the bone. Used properly, bone or tissue damage is very rare.
Case 7 - Figure 8
Figure 8: Once the tooth elevates up and out of the socket, you should stop the wrist rotation with the Physics Forceps and deliver the tooth with a pincer type device.
Case 7 - Figure 9
Figure 9: Radiograph of extraction site.
Case 7 - Figure 10
Figure 10: In this case, an OsteoGen plug was utilized as the bone was preserved during the extraction process. An OsteoGen can be utilized with all the walls are in tact or not damage during the extraction procedure. The OsteoGen plug will predictably grow bone or preserve the socket site. It is NOT a collagen plug.
Case 7 - Figure 11
Figure 11: In this case a Large: 10mm Diameter x 20mm Long plug was utilized and it was cut into three (3) pieces so the product can be placed properly into each of the three socket sites of the three rooted upper molar that was extracted.
Case 7 - Figure 12
Figure 12: The Osteogen pieces are properly placed dry into each socket.
Case 7 - Figure 13
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Case 7 - Figure 14
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Case 7 - Figure 15
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Case 7 - Figure 16
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Case 7 - Figure 17
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Case 7 - Figure 18
Figure 18: No membrane is required with the OsteoGen plugs, which is a large benefit as a lot of practitioners can struggle to properly place a membrane or to have predictable results utilizing a membrane.
Case 7 - Figure 19
Figure 19: Radiograph immediately following placement of OsteoGen plug. The site will heal for 3-4 months prior to implant placement.


Case 6 - Figure 1
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Case 6 - Figure 5
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Case 5 - Figure 1
Figure 1, 2 and 3: Two maxillary upper right teeth to be extracted in this case.
Case 5 - Figure 2
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Case 5 - Figure 3
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Case 5 - Figure 4
Figure 4: VibraJect injection comfort system utilized to minimize injection discomfort for the patient.
Case 5 - Figure 5
Figure 5: Temporary flipper type device utilized during healing process.
Case 5 - Figure 6
Figure 6-10: Physics Forceps (GoldenDent) Upper Right extraction instrument is utilized to extract the tooth. The instrument handles are never squeezed and the instrument relies on the concept of leverage utilizing its patented beak and bumper technique.
Case 5 - Figure 7
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Case 5 - Figure 8
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Case 5 - Figure 9
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Case 5 - Figure 10
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Case 5 - Figure 11
Figure 11, 12 and 13 : Once the tooth is released utilizing the Physics Forceps, the tooth is delivered with a pincer type device to deliver the tooth. The tooth delivery instrument (EZD from GoldenDent) is the most effective instrument for such purposes.
Case 5 - Figure 12
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Case 5 - Figure 13
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Case 5 - Figure 14
Figure 14 and 15: Physics Forceps (GoldenDent) Upper Right extraction instrument is utilized to extract the second tooth.
Case 5 - Figure 15
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Case 5 - Figure 16
Figure 16 and 17: Again, the EZD tooth delivery instrument (GoldenDent) is utilized to delivery the tooth from the socket.
Case 5 - Figure 17
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Case 5 - Figure 18
Figure 18 and 19: Post extraction socket sites. Based on the atraumatic manner of such extractions, the bone and tissue are preserved.
Case 5 - Figure 19
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Case 5 - Figure 20
Figure 20, 21 and 22: The socket is curetted for any excess granulation tissue. It is very important to properly curette the sockets prior to grafting. Curette, curette, curette the site!
Case 5 - Figure 21
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Case 5 - Figure 22
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Case 5 - Figure 23
Figure 23, 24 and 25: The facial and palatal attached gingiva is elevated using an envelope flat (no vertical incisions) showing the four preserved walls. The flap allows for laying of the membrane passively on at least 2mm on facial and palatal bone. If you do not have the membrane at least 2mm on solid bone, the results may be unpredictable. This is a very important step in the process.
Case 5 - Figure 24
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Case 5 - Figure 25
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Case 5 - Figure 26
Figure 26: GoldOss™ Allografts - Mineralized Cortical Bone Powder - 1.0cc 250-1,000um (GoldenDent) was utilized for the graft and placed into a mixing dish.
Case 5 - Figure 27
Figure 27 and 28: EpiGuide® (GoldenDent) is a uniquely structured bioresorbable polyactide (PLA) membrane designed to be used in many applications within guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedures. The EPI guide is large and must be cut to size. In this case, one membrane was used, cut in half, for each socket site.
Case 5 - Figure 28
Figure 28:
Case 5 - Figure 29
Figure 29: Allograph is mixed with sterile water or saline, where it will become a gell-like substance for easier transfer to the socket sites.
Case 5 - Figure 30
Figure 30: A 2.4mm Hahn implant (Glidewell) system Pilot drill is used to establish proper depth and mesial-distal angulation of the final implant
Case 5 - Figure 31
Figure 31: A 3.5mm diameter Osteotomy bur is used to widen the site and prepare for the final implant
Case 5 - Figure 32
Figure 32: The 3.5mm Osteotomy bur is positioned to proper depth into the socket site approximately 1mm subcrestal
Case 5 - Figure 33
Figure 33: A digital radiograph of the 3.5 Osteotomy bur illustrates proper length and angulation
Case 5 - Figure 34
Figure 34: A 4.3mm Osteotomy bur widens the site.
Case 5 - Figure 35
Figure 35: A 4.3mm diameter Hahn dental implant (Glidewell) will be placed into the prepared site
Case 5 - Figure 36
Figure 36: The implant is threaded into the osteotomy site. The aggresive nature of the implant allows for outstanding initial implant stability
Case 5 - Figure 37
Figure 37: The Hahn implant is threaded to ideal position
Case 5 - Figure 38
Figure 38: The implant torques to over 45Ncm which creates outstanding initital stability
Case 5 - Figure 39
Figure 39: The digital radiograph illustrates ideal position of the Hahn implant
Case 5 - Figure 40
Figure 40: A second Hahn implant osteotomy is prepared using the same technique
Case 5 - Figure 41
Figure 41: A 3.5 mm Osteotomy bur is used to begin creation of the osteotomy site.
Case 5 - Figure 42
Figure 42: A 4.3mm diameter osteotomy bur creates the final preparation for a 4.3mm diameter Hahn implant
Case 5 - Figure 43
Figure 43: The implant is threaded to position.
Case 5 - Figure 44
Figure 44: The two Hahn implants (Glidewell) are ideally placed mesial-distally. Note the facial defects
Case 5 - Figure 45
Figure 45: Flat cover screws are threaded into the implant body
Case 5 - Figure 46
Figure 46: The cover screws in position
Case 5 - Figure 47
Figure 47: Occlusal view of the implants in proper position ready for grafting of the bony defects.
Case 5 - Figure 47
Figure 47: Occlusal view of the implants in proper position ready for grafting of the bony defects.
Case 5 - Figure 48
Figure 48 and 49: The EPI guide membrane is properly tucked having at least 2mm of the membrane on solid bone structure to ensure predictable results. Tissue grows 10x faster than bone, so it is imperative to prevent the tissue from invaginating the socket.
Case 5 - Figure 49
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Case 5 - Figure 50
Figure 50, 51 and 52: Allograph graft material is placed into the sockets. It is important not to over pack or crush the particles upon placement into the socket. The product is designed with different particle sizes, where if it is over packed there is a risk that the material will all become the same size particles and resorb at the same rates.
Case 5 - Figure 51
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Case 5 - Figure 52
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Case 5 - Figure 53
Figure 53: The EPI Guide membrane is properly tucked on the lingual aspect of the tooth on at least 2mm of solid bone.
Case 5 - Figure 54
Figure 54, 55 and 56: Vilet 3-0 FS-2 reverse cutting sutures are utilized going from the inside toward the lingual, not engaging the membrane.
Case 5 - Figure 55
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Case 5 - Figure 56
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Case 5 - Figure 57
Figure 57: Postoperative view of surgical site.
Case 5 - Figure 58
Figure 58, 59 and 60: CBCT imaging (Green PaX-i3D [VaTech America]) postoperative view of surgical site, dental implant.
Case 5 - Figure 59
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Dentistry by Dr. Tim Kosinski
Case 4 - Figure 1
Figure 1: Preoperative digital radiograph of symptomtic tooth deemed non restorable by our endodontist
Case 4 - Figure 2
Figure 2: Occlusal view of old crown. Note the compromised crowns on either side of tooth to be extracted. Conventional extraction techniques may make removal tenuous.
Case 4 - Figure 3
Figure 3: The beak of the Physics Forcep (GoldenDent, Detroit, MI) engages 1-3mm subgingival on the palatal surface of the root. This is the working end of the instrument that creates tension and enzymatic release by the body resulting is disintegration of the periodontal ligaments.
Case 4 - Figure 4
Figure 4: With simple wrist rotation and no squeezing of the instrument, the tooth lifts up and out of the socket with minimal trauma to the tissue, bone. The patient’s response is positive because no force is placed on the tooth.
Case 4 - Figure 5
Figure 5: The three rooted maxillary molar tooth has divergent roots, but was atraumatically removed with minimal force.
Case 4 - Figure 6
Figure 6: The socket is curetted for any excess granulation tissue
Case 4 - Figure 7
Figure 7: The facial and palatal attached gingiva is elevated using an envelope flat (no vertical incisions) showing the four preserved walls. The flap allows for laying of the membrane passively on at least 2mm on facial and palatal bone.
Case 4 - Figure 8
Figure 8: Here a non resorbable membrane (Cytoplast, Implant Direct, Thousand Oaks, CA) is passively positioned.
Case 4 - Figure 9
Figure 9: Allograft bone graft is placed into the socket. The material is condensed firmly, but no packed like amalgam. (GoldOss Allograft, 250-1000 microns, GoldenDent, Detroit, MI)
Case 4 - Figure 10
Figure 10: Cytoplast membrane is passively positioned facial and palatal and will not easily dislodge.
Case 4 - Figure 11
Figure 11: Vilet Polyglactin resorbable sutures (Implant Direct, Thousand Oaks,CA) are placed over the membrane to help keep it in position during the initial healing period of about one week..
Case 4 - Figure 12
Figure 12: Immediate digital periapical radiograph of grafted site.
Case 4 - Figure 13
Figure 13: After approximately one week, the sutures are removed and the membrane remains in position preventing epithelial invagination into the bone substitute.
Case 4 - Figure 14
Figure 14: After approximately 6 weeks the non resorbable membrane is simply removed with an explore. No anesthesia is needed.
Case 4 - Figure 15
Figure 15: Osteoid is created under the membrane. This is a bone precursor which will be covered over with epithelium in a very short time.
Case 4 - Figure 16
Figure 16, 17: After approximately 5 months on allograft healing, a 4.7mm X 10mm Glidewell Inclusive tapered implant (Glidewell Lab, Irvine, CA) is torqued to 30Ncm and a 2mm tall healing abutment is immediately placed, making this a one stage surgical procedure.
Case 4 - Figure 17
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Case 4 - Figure 18
Figure 18: Following an additional 4 months of integration of the dental implant, the healing abutment is removed prior to impression making. Note the nice, healthy gingival cuff formed.
Case 4 - Figure 19
Figure 19, 20: A transfer assembly engages the internal hex of the implant and is checked for complete seating with a digital radiograph.
Case 4 - Figure 20
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Case 4 - Figure 21
Figure 21: A clean impression is made using Kettenbach LP (Hauppauge, NY) polyvinyl siloxane light and medium body impression material. Note there are no voids..
Case 4 - Figure 22
Figure 22: A custom titanium abutment is fabricated and toqured to 30Ncm. Note the margins of the abutment is just slightly subgingival allowing easy cement clean up.
Case 4 - Figure 23
Figure 23: A Bruxzir monolithic zirconia crown (Glidewell Lab, Irvine, CA) is fabricated and cemented using Improv implant provisional cement.(Alvelogro Inc., Washington)
Case 4 - Figure 24
Figure 24: Emergence profile is created with a proper foundation of atraumatic extraction, grafting, membrane protection and implant placement.



Dentistry by Dr. Tim Kosinski
Case 3 - Figure 1
Figure 1: Pre-operative digital radiograph of a non-restorable mandibular molar.
Case 3 - Figure 2
Figure 2 & 3: The crowned tooth is to be extracted and the site prepared for future dental implant placement. Crowns are often not an issue with the Physics Forceps (GoldenDent) as the beak is engaged on solid tooth structure, versus engaging the crown. However, on a lower molar it can sometimes be helpful to section the tooth, where the crown would have to be removed first.
Case 3 - Figure 3
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Case 3 - Figure 4
Figure 4: The WAMkey crown remover (GoldenDent) is used to remove the crown before the tooth can be sectioned.
Case 3 - Figure 5
Figure 5 & 6: A small opening or “window” is made on the buccal side of the tooth, where the goal of such window is to identify where the cement layer is between the crown and the tooth. Once the position is located by feel or using loops, the channel should extend into the center of the cement layer as it is best to leverage from the center of the preparation or on the long axis of the tooth.
Case 3 - Figure 6
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Case 3 - Figure 7
Figure 7: The WAMkey #1, the smallest size instrument in term of head size, is inserted into the opening. The head of the instrument lays flat when inserted into the crown. Once the instrument has been inserted the instrument is simply turned 1/4 turn with your finger tips allowing the instrument head to stand upwards and to gently break or release the cement layer allowing the crown to be removed in an efficient manner.
Case 3 - Figure 8
Figure 8: As you can see in this image, the crown is completely preserved and it makes for a great temporary, or can even be re-used on a permanent basis.
Case 3 - Figure 9
Figure 9 - 12:Using a surgical bur, the lower molar us sectioned into two roots, where now the tooth can be extracted as two individual roots using the Physics Forceps (GoldenDent).
Case 3 - Figure 10
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Case 3 - Figure 11
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Case 3 - Figure 12
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Case 3 - Figure 13
Figure 13: The Lower Universal Physics Forceps in placed on the tooth. In doing this, the bean engages the lingual aspect of the root and the bumper is placed as low or deep in the vestibule as possible to ensure the instrument can achieve the proper leverage it is designed to utilize.
Case 3 - Figure 14
Figure 14: The instrument handles are never squeezed and held lightly in your hands, where the instrument is really a lingual elevator rather than a forcep. Squeezing the handles is not the technique that should be utilized here, where the handles should be held very lightly and just held allowing the instrument to do the work. No strength or arm pressure is required.
Case 3 - Figure 15
Figure 15 - 17: The narrow beak of the Physics Forceps engages each root separately to elevate the tooth 1-3mm from the socket. Once the tooth has released from the socket and moves 1-3mm the instrument has performed its designed function and another instrument should be used to deliver the tooth.
Case 3 - Figure 16
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Case 3 - Figure 17
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Case 3 - Figure 18
Figure 18 & 19: The distal root is delivered from the socket after the Physics Forceps.
Case 3 - Figure 19
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Case 3 - Figure 20
Figure 20:Extracted socket site showing distal root extracted and mesial root to be extracted.
Case 3 - Figure 21
Figure 21 - 23: The Distal root is elevated with the Physics Forceps and then delivered with a delivery instrument..
Case 3 - Figure 22
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Case 3 - Figure 22b
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Case 3 - Figure 23
Figure 24: Extraction site. The socket site is aggressively curetted, removing any granulation tissue resulting from the fracture. This is an important step for any grafting procedure..
Case 3 - Figure 24
Figure 25: Radiograph of extraction site.
Case 3 - Figure 25
Figure 26 - 29: An Osteogen Plug (GoldenDent) is cut in half, approximating the contour of the socket site and placed into each root. The product is available in a large and a slim size. This is not just a collagen plug and it does predictability grow bone. The plug is lightly condensed into the socket site and inserted dry.
Case 3 - Figure 26
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Case 3 - Figure 27
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Case 3 - Figure 28
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Case 3 - Figure 29
Figure 30: Suturing is completed. Note that no membrane is necessary with this Osteogen Plug, which is a great benefit in terms of time savings and from a financial perspective.
Case 3 - Figure 30
Figure 31: Immediate post operative radiographs illustrate that the material is initially radiolucent.
Case 3 - Figure 31
Figure 32:



Dentistry by Dr. Tim Kosinski
Case 2 - Figure 1
Figure 1: Pre-operative digital radiograph of a non-restorable, vertically fractured, maxillary right second bicuspid tooth.
Case 2 - Figure 2
Figure 2: The crowned tooth is to be extracted and the site prepared for future dental implant placement. Crowns are often not an issue with the Physics Forceps (GoldenDent) as the beak is engaged on solid tooth structure, versus engaging the crown. However, on a lower molar it can sometimes be helpful to section the tooth. The WAMkey crown remover (GoldenDent) is used to remove the crown before the tooth can be sectioned.
Case 2 - Figure 1
Figure 3: The Vibraject Injection Comfort Solution (GoldenDent) vibrating attachment is attached to a conventional syringe to make the anesthesia relatively pain free.
Case 2 - Figure 2
Figure 4, 5: The maxillary right Physics Forcep (Golden Dental Solution) is used to atraumatically remove the tooth from the socket. Physics Forceps come in a series of 4 instruments, a maxillary right, maxillary anterior, maxillary left and a universal mandibular forcep - known as the Standard Series. The beak is placed onto the palatal root structure 1-3mm subgingival and the bumper is placed into the vestibule as deep as possible.
Case 2 - Figure 3
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Case 2 - Figure 4
Figure 6: There is no squeezing of the instrument, rather rotational forces placed by the beak of the instrument on the palatal root surface creates an enzymatic reaction breaking down the periodontal ligament (PDL) and releasing the tooth from the socket. The instrument acts as a lever with a fulcrum. Again, no squeezing of the instrument.
Case 2 - Figure 5
Figure 7: As the PDL is broken down the tooth is elevated up and out of the socket about 3mm.
Case 2 - Figure 6
Figure 8, 9: A tooth delivery instrument is used to easily remove the tooth from the socket. The Physics Forceps is not used to deliver the tooth all the way from the socket as this can increase any risk of damaging the surrounding bone. The vertical fracture is clearly noted and the bone is preserved.
Case 2 - Figure 7
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Case 2 - Figure 10
Figure 10: The socket site is aggressively curetted, removing any granulation tissue resulting from the fracture. This is an important step for any grafting procedure.
Case 2 - Figure 11
Figure 11: An Osteogen Plug (GoldenDent) is cut in half, approximating the contour of the socket site. The product is available in a large and a slim size. This is not just a collagen plug and it does predictability grow bone.
Case 2 - Figure 12
Figure 12: The plug is lightly condensed into the socket site and inserted dry.
Case 2 - Figure 13
Figure 13: Vilet resorbable sutures (Implant Direct) are used here which keeps the OsteoGen Plug in place.
Case 2 - Figure 14
Figure 14: Suturing is completed. Note that no membrane is necessary with this Osteogen Plug, which is a great benefit in terms of time savings and from a financial perspective.
Case 2 - Figure 15
Figure 15, 16: Immediate post operative radiographs illustrate that the material is initially radiolucent. The reverse contract view illustrates the material passively in place.
Case 2 - Figure 16
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Case 2 - Figure 17
Figure 17: Two week post operative view of tissue healing and osteoid formation at the crest of the surgical site. The site will be allowed to integrate for approximately 4 months prior to dental implant surgical placement.
Case 2 - Figure 18
Figure 18: After approximately 3 months of integration, the grafted material objectively appears more opaque indicating integration of bone.
Case 2 - Figure 19
Figure 19: The healed ridge is primed for a predictable dental implant placement.
Case 2 - Figure 20
Figure 20: To determine the amount of vertical bone available, a 5mm ball bearing is placed into the edentulous space. This known diameter ball bearing is measured using the Dexis system. This allows for an accurate measurement of the vertical bone available from crest to what appears to be the floor of the sinus.
Case 2 - Figure 21
Figure 21, 22: A 2mm pilot drill from the Hahn dental implant system (Glidewell Direct) penetrates into the bone site approximately 6mm. This allows for proper angulation prior to creating the final osteotomy.
Case 2 - Figure 22
Figure 22:
Case 2 - Figure 23
Figure 23: The pilot drill is brought to the proper depth, which here is 13mm.
Case 2 - Figure 24
Figure 24: A 4.3mm diameter tapered bur makes the final osteotomy.
Case 2 - Figure 25
Figure 25: The Hahn implant is threaded in to position and torqued here to 40Ncm, establishing excellent initial stability in the bone grown from the OsteoGen Plug.
Case 2 - Figure 26
Figure 26: A 3mm tall healing abutment is torqued to 20Ncm allowing the tissue to heal around this abutment, eliminating the need for future uncovering of the implant following four months of integration.
Case 2 - Figure 27
Figure 27: The post operative radiograph indicates nice position of the implant.



Dentistry by Dr. Tim Kosinski
Case 1 - Figure 3
Figure 1: Preoperative radiograph of non-restorable maxillary right canine, that requires extraction, which previously had root canal therapy and a post and crown.
Case 1 - Figure 5
Figure 2: Preoperative image of surgical site that shows tissue irritation and slight malposition of the fractured maxillary cuspid tooth.
Case 1 - Figure 8
Figure 3: Atraumatic extraction utilizing the Physics Forceps (GoldenDent).
Case 1 - Figure 7
Figure 4: Proper hand position or hold when utilizing Physics Forceps (GoldenDent) technique.
Case 1 - Figure 9
Figure 5: Tooth is delivered from the socket with pincer type instrument (EZD [GoldenDent]) as Physics Forceps are not designed to remove the tooth all the way from the socket but simply to elevate the tooth or release the periodontal ligaments.
Case 1 - Figure 1
Figure 6: Broken down root easily removed from the socket.
Case 1 - Figure 10
Figure 7: Flap is reflected in preparation for graft and immediate implant placement, as well as to demonstrate facial bone.
Case 1 - Figure 17
Figure 8: CBCT imaging (Green PaX-i3D [VaTech America]) is utilized to demonstrate bone is intact and not damaged during Physics Forceps extraction as well as to prepare for immediate implant placement.
Case 1 - Figure 9
Figure 9: A tooth delivery instrument is used to remove the tooth from the socket, as the Physics Forceps are not designed to deliver the tooth completely.
Case 1 - Figure 12
Figure 10: Cytoplast (Implant Direct) membrane was cut to size and engaged onto the facial plate of bone at least 2mm.
Case 1 - Figure 13
Figure 11: Allograft DBM crunch putty with cortical chips in 1.0cc syringe is utilized (GoldenDent).
Case 1 - Figure 14
Figure 12: A 3.7mm diameter by 13mm long Implant Direct Legacy 3 dental implant implant was utilized in this case (Implant Direct).
Case 1 - Figure 15
Figure 13: Membrane is tucked securely in place at least 2mm onto solid bone.
Case 1 - Figure 16
Figure 14: Vilet 3-0 FS-2 reverse cutting sutures (Implant Direct) utilized going from the inside toward the lingual, not engaging the membrane.
Case 1 - Figure 2
Figure 15: Postoperative view of surgical site.
Case 1 - Figure 4
Figure 16: CBCT imaging (Green PaX-i3D [VaTech America]) postoperative view of surgical site, dental implant.
Case 1 - Figure 6
Figure 17: Two week post operative image of the site.
Case 1 - Figure 18
Figure 18: Non-invasive tissue punch utilized to locate the implant.
Case 1 - Figure 19
Figures 19-20: Final implant and crown images.
Case 1 - Figure 20
Figure 20